Poor puppy

Luke lying around depressed

The big thing going on this week, actually on Monday, is that Luke got neutered. The poor thing is now lying around depressed, first because he doesn’t feel well, and second because he often has this stupid cone around his neck. We take it off as often as we can, but when we do, he immediately tries to lick his sutures, which we can’t allow him to do. Poor puppy. He’ll be missing at least this week of Puppy Play and Train.

Last Wednesday, only Autumn and I made the hike, although we took her dog Frankie and Luke. We tried Salmon Creek Park because dogs are allowed. Autumn is house-sitting for Maja this month and can’t leave her dog home with Maja’s cats because he’s afraid of cats. It was a cool day but super muggy. The park turned out to be more urban than expected. It’s a nice park for city dwellers, but we’re more used to hiking in wilder areas. But it was more because of the mugginess that we decided fairly soon to turn back. Although the park got a little wilder as you went on, we were just feeling uncomfortable. It does have a nice big swimming hole near the parking lot that might be fun to explore at another time. (Dogs aren’t allowed in that area of the park.)

Because both my niece and sister were sick, I also went to art class alone. I am working now on finicky aqua spots, where I paint them in a darker color and then come back across them with white speckles and sometimes yellow or black ones. While I finished the other colors of spots in one class, so far, I have been working on these for two and have just finished one arm of my starfish, three arms of which are visible.

On Friday we picked up our friend Christine and all went to breakfast at Elmer’s. Then we went back to her house for a while and let Luke and Duchess run around her back yard. She has a beautiful yard, full of flowers, but doesn’t mind the dogs running through them. I ate too much at breakfast, though, and had to lie down when we came back.

Luke had his first class in a while on Saturday. He actually did pretty well considering that he loses his brains if he misses class. One good thing about it was they held it in the front room instead of the back. The back is open to the elements and is covered in astroturf, and they let the dogs pee back there. So, Luke spends every class back there trying to put his nose to the ground and completely loses all concentration.

Hillary stopped eating chicken. I gave her some leftovers of some fish we ate the other night, and she just gobbled them up. So, I poached her a whole fish yesterday. Now, every time I come into the kitchen, she begs for fish. I hope this won’t be like the other foodstuffs—that she’ll eat it ravenously for a while and then start turning up her nose at it, just when I begin to think she might recover. Right now, she only seems to be eating the fish and some cottage cheese, and I’m not sure the cottage cheese is good for her. But at this point, I’ll give her anything she will eat.

Over the weekend, I started mowing the orchard. I began Saturday afternoon but only did about a third of it. It was just too hot. Then, the temperature went down drastically on Sunday. I worked on it Sunday morning and afternoon and got all but one little strip of it done. I intended to finish that on Monday, but it was raining on and off all day. In any case, we had to get up at 5 AM in order to get Luke to the vet by 7, so I decided it wasn’t the day to be mowing.

Here’s my first tomato of the season.

And when we came back from the vet, I harvested my first tomato of the season. It is supposed to be a big one, at least according to the label on the plant, but is only about three inches in diameter. However, it is nice and red. I hope it won’t be my only tomato of the year, like the yellow one was last year. I do have several more on the vines of both plants, but right now the largest is about an inch in diameter.

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A slow week

Last week was a little slow, as many of my usual activities were cancelled because of the holiday. The dog training classes were off the last two weeks, Mischa was sick so could not go to taekwondo, art class was cancelled, and even Luke’s Puppy Play took place only on this Tuesday during the last three weeks. So, about the only regular thing I did this last week was our Wednesday hike.

Here’s a picture of Autumn and Luke on the trail.

That was an interesting one, because my sister-in-law, Nancy, found us a new hike. It was an easy one because it was along an old logging road up by Yale Lake, but it was a hard one because it was seven miles long, 3 1/2 miles in, and then of course back out. Since it was a flat hike, two of us took our dogs. Nancy brought Freckles, and I brought Luke.

It was a cool, cloudy day, but the hike was beautiful, high above the lake with some towering cliffs above us and a few cascades coming down. At one point, a bald eagle flew off from a tree nearby us and then, after flying away down the lake, came back toward us along the road. We had a great time but were very tired by the time we got out. Luke didn’t make a peep the rest of the day.

On Friday, because there was no Puppy Play on Thursday, Christine and I scheduled an additional pack walk just for us. We just walked around her neighborhood, but it was fun because we had coffee at her house and visited for a while afterwards, and the dogs ran around in her back yard.

The dog trainer was supposedly still doing pack walks in the evenings, which were supposed to be posted on Facebook, but even though I look at Facebook daily, I have yet to see one of her posts, except one saying there would be no pack walk.

Our weather has continued to be about 10 degrees cooler than normal for this time, making a nice, slow-starting summer. It was supposed to get hot last week after the 4th, but although it was sunny most days, it didn’t seem to be that hot. It has been muggy enough, though, for us to get very warm when hiking or pack walking. Today it is raining, which figures, because yesterday I watered our small trees.

Hillary ate a bunch of lunch meat for about a week, and now, suddenly, she has moved back to baby food. She still wants some lunch meat at times, but she sometimes is unable to eat it without most of it falling back out of her mouth. I don’t understand this, because at other times, she is able to eat it without too much difficulty. We know her teeth aren’t in great shape, but there are times when she inhales the lunch meat. Yesterday, after eating a lot of lunch meat in the morning, she suddenly would only eat tuna fish.

She also occasionally hides. That is a bad sign, because cats usually do that when they’re feeling really bad, also because of the place she hides—up inside the box spring of our bed, which has one end of the bottom covering ripped free, probably from the move. The first time she did it, she was missing all day, and she was so weak at that time that I thought it was the end and she might die up there. However, she came out in the middle of the night, climbed up onto the bed, and slept with me. That was last Friday night, and I thought it was nice until she got up in the  middle of the night and sat on my back. I thought she was trying to get warm, but she jumped off the bed (loudly and with poor coordination) right afterwards and then I smelled a really bad smell. I was turning around trying to find out what it was when I realized that I had poop on my arm. She had shat on the bedspread when she was sitting on my back. I had to get up in the middle of the night and remove the bedspread and put it in the washer, and I was fairly cold the rest of the night. To make things worse, I got up to go to the bathroom later that night and stepped in more poop that I had either inadvertently dropped off the bedspread or she had left after she got off the bed. And that was not all, because even later I got up again and stepped in a pool of pee. She has been using her cat box at times, just enough that we have to clean it out, but she has also been using the hallway, mostly for peeing. End of life with a cat is not a fun experience. She is fighting it all the way, though, and more power to her.

I hope she is able to eat enough to get her strength back and maybe make a recovery. So far, she seems to be a little better but she is still very thin from the period where she would eat very little of what we offered her. My friend Deb’s cat died last year, and she said she behaved much the same way.

We are upset because DirecTV and our local CBS station have parted ways. We are just finding out how many programs we watched on CBS, particularly, 60 Minutes, The Good Fight, Elementary, and CBS Sunday Morning, which was our Sunday morning routine. In Austin there was also a threat of this happening with one station, but it was resolved before it happened and they notified us of it ahead of time. In this case, we knew nothing about it until we found that some of our recorded programs weren’t actually there. So far, the problem has not been resolved, and I have posted a complaint on DirecTV’s Facebook page telling them if they can’t take care of this, we’ll have to find another provider. Even if they can’t sign up our local station because it’s owned by NexStar, they ought to be able to find a CBS station that isn’t that they can provide us. The other networks mentioned in the article I read about it have not been cut off here, so they must not be owned by NexStar.

In Austin, we were able to hang a wire out the window and pick up the local stations over the air the old-fashioned way, but our house was right across the river from most of the radio stations. Here, that has not worked, so yesterday while we were running our errands (always finishing off with a visit to the library), we ran to Home Depot and picked up an HDTV antenna. I hope we have it up before we miss too many more programs, but you never know with Wayne’s projects whether they will be done in a few days or a few years or never.

That’s about it for this week.

A scent of fresh Heyer

One of the pleasures of this weekend was a visit to a small local theater where Deb and I saw they were doing a play based on a Georgette Heyer book, The Talisman Ring. Now, I am not a romance reader, but I have been fond of Georgette Heyer’s clever and funny Regency romances since I was in college, and I introduced Deb to them last year. So, when I saw that this tiny theater was doing an Heyer-based play, we just had to get tickets.

The poster for The Talisman Ring

The play was in the Love Street Playhouse in Woodland, Washington. It holds fewer than 100 people and has a very small stage, hampered by doors that have to be opened to make it a little larger. We were delightfully surprised at the production. It is one of Heyer’s typically frothy stories with a complicated plot about a lost heir, a false accusation of murder, and a lost ring. We found it original in its approach to some difficulties (not being able to have horses on stage, for example) and very funny. The two female leads were particularly good. I was struck by a scene where the standard dashing hero (who, if you know Heyer, you will know is not the actual hero of the play) flings one of the heroines onto his horse and rides off into the woods. The couple merely sat on a bench with wheels, while people holding branches and small trees ran past them.

Anyway, we found it lots of fun (despite being hampered by having one of the actors from the Magenta Theater in a lead role—the weakest performance, we thought) and have decided to get tickets for their next production, And Then There Were None.

Luke and I also had some sort of visitation last week. I was outside in the garden and he was on the front lawn chewing his bone. At one point, he suddenly ran from the front yard past the garden, which is in the side yard. Just as he did that, a creature ran the same direction only up above me on the ridge above our front yard. It was large and made a lot of noise but ran swiftly, too fast for a human. Oddly, it wasn’t Luke that ran last. He wasn’t running after it, it began running after he did but did not come down to our level. I didn’t see it, but I think it sounded too large and noisy to be a deer. In any case, if it had been an animal that was startled by Luke, it would have run first, not last. I talked it over with my pack walk ladies, and one of them suggested it might be a cougar or a bear. Right above us on the ridge, which is about the height of our one-story house. And I suspect that if it ran after Luke did, it was stalking him and did nothing because it saw me at the last moment. I have been keeping a much closer eye on him when he’s been outside on his own (which he doesn’t like to do anyway; he is constantly asking to go out but then refusing to go unless I go with him).

Shawn and I on the 45th Parallel trail at Whipple Creek Park, this photo sneakily taken by Nancy

Last Wednesday, we went to Whipple Creek Park for our hike. We had originally planned to take a very easy hike, because my niece wanted to bring her friend, who is not fit. However, they cancelled because my niece was sick. It was the first hike for my sister-in-law, Nancy, so we went somewhere a little more interesting. At her suggestion, instead of just hiking the main paths, we took a secondary path that cut right through the middle of the park. It was actually an easier path than the main ones, because it had very little elevation change. We were the only ones on that path, although we passed several runners and horse riders on the main paths.

There was no puppy play again for Luke this week, and no classes either, so on Friday, Christine and I took our dogs for a walk in Lewisville Park. It was starting to get warm by the time we finished, a trend that continued until Monday, when a thunderstorm and a cold front came in. The temperature went down Monday evening about 10 degrees in a few minutes, and it continues to be cooler than average.

Hillary continues to improve, I think. She has changed from eating kitten food to eating chicken breast lunch meat (low sodium). It is probably not really good for her, but everything else she chose to eat, she stopped eating after a day or two. Not only has she been eating the chicken breast since Friday, but she has been devouring it, begging for more almost every time I pass her. I hope to see her gain some weight and seem a little less weak. We tried giving her chicken breast that we cooked and tore up about a week ago, but she did not eat it. There must be something about the softer texture of the lunch meat that she likes. Wayne is not enjoying the expense, but if she’ll eat it, she gets it, as far as I’m concerned.

In art class, I finished the blackish teal color and started painting some aqua spots on the starfish. These spots are speckled in the photo I am painting from, and to re-create the effect, I am painting them with a slightly darker color and then dotting them with white while the paint is still wet. It took me a long time just to do a few. In a few instances, I noticed some yellow as well as white, so I have dotted some of them with yellow. I didn’t get very far doing these spots last week, and this week there is no class because of the holiday.

My first batch of green peas

In the garden, I’ve started to pick spinach and I have harvested just a few pods of green peas. Last year, I only got enough peas to add a few to a mixed vegetable dish. This year, I have that many already and a bunch more pods coming in.

The other notable thing I did this week was finish reading a book written by my middle brother. Although it is fiction, it is based on true events in our family, some of which I knew about and some not. It was difficult for me to read, and I admit to being a little freaked out about it.

Little birdies

I have been hearing a lot of cheeping going on from the nests around the house. Last year, we had a family of woodpeckers in a dead tree at the edge of our pond, and we used to go down and sit on our bench and watch the parents feed the babies. I think that attention made them move on, though, because they’re not there this year, but there is a family in a dead tree across the gravel road from our house, and from our orchard I can seen the parents flying in and out of the hole and hear the babies asking for food. They also seem to be finding most of their food from one of our walnut trees.

Those aren’t the only babies I’ve heard recently, though. On Saturday after dog class, we had Mischa in the car because we took her to taekwondo. We drove out to the alpaca farm, because Wayne had promised his brother he would buy more socks for his friend. However, when we got there, we saw that they weren’t opening for 45 minutes. Wayne had to go to the bathroom, so we drove up the road to Daybreak Park, where he visited the restroom and Mischa, Luke, and I walked down to the water. As we began to return, we heard a terrific noise and then a huge bald eagle, its wingspan close to six feet, flew away from a tree about 20 feet away. In the distance, we could hear its babies crying for food, well, shrieking, really.

We went to get me coffee and then we returned to the alpaca farm. We had wondered why there were so many cars there, and it turned out we were just in time for shearing. One alpaca was done when we got there, and by the time we left, about three more had followed. One of them, who the store owner told us was a prima donna who didn’t like to be touched, screamed the entire time she was down, but the others took it calmly. I would imagine it would feel much better in the summer without the fleece, although lately we haven’t had any hot weather.

Here’s my first artichoke. It is only two inches tall.

In my garden, I have been harvesting lettuce and sugar snap peas, but I have a largish green tomato coming in and two small ones. A bigger surprise is an eensy beensy artichoke. When I planted my artichoke plant, my niece told me it would be three years before I got an artichoke. I planted it only a year ago, and here is one, albeit only two inches high so far. I don’t know if it will get big or it I should just let it turn into a beautiful purple flower. But if it grows large enough, I’m going to eat it!

This week, Hillary seems to be doing much better. She has taken up residence on the kitchen table instead of hiding in the bedroom, we assume to be around people, and she is eating a little bit more than she was. She seems to have decided to prefer the kitten food, so that’s what we’re going with.

Last Wednesday for our hike, we returned to the Yacolt Burn trailhead to walk the Tarbell trail. At that point, it is a mountain bike trail. We walked it in the spring and it did not look particularly like a bike trail, but this time it did, with ramps and wide, banked turns. It made difficult hiking, and I’m not sure we’ll try that trail again. It was particularly difficult walking down some of the ramps.

Luke’s Puppy Play and Train was cancelled all week because the kennel got a dog flu, so Christine and I scheduled a puppy play event at our house for just Luke and Duchess. On Thursday, Christine brought Duchess over, and we let them play in the wolf pen. Then we had coffee and homemade scones. Of course, Wayne joined us for the scones.

Friday, I waited a while expecting to hear from my sister-in-law Nancy, but did not, so we went out to run our errands. She texted on Saturday and invited me over with my niece Katrina and the kids. They had a new trail cut around the perimeter of their house, and we all walked it, except Mark. It was cut but not cleared, so there was lots of blackberry bramble to get through and the elevation was quite steep. We went in near their driveway and came out above the house. They have already bought some really interesting new furniture, finding a bed made out of logs (not the traditional log bed but one of cut slabs of log) and some bookcases put together with pegs. They also bought an antique dining table and chairs and a reading lamp. They now have their couch facing the view from the window, and Mark said he is thinking about not even putting his television together, because he likes just looking at the view.

This week the Puppy Play is cancelled again. We had our usual pack walk, only we went downtown instead of walking at the park and in the residential area. Yesterday, we just ran errands.

In art class, I have finished the teal part of my starfish and have started on some blackish teal parts.

 

 

Getting back to normal

This week was about getting back to normal after my visitors left. We had so many long expeditions, with me driving all day, that it took me a few days before I didn’t feel really tired.

On Wednesday, as I mentioned briefly in the last post, we went over to see my brother Mark’s new house. He and his wife Nancy had moved up from Berkeley very quickly after spotting the house of their dreams online. He said it didn’t fit any of the conditions they had agreed upon for a new house. They wanted a small, one-story house, they got a larger, three-story log house on 13 acres with lots of landscaping. It’s a beautiful house, and I wish I had taken my phone with me when we went to visit, so that I could have taken pictures. The shell of the cabin the original owner had built, but then he himself did all the interiors, and it was beautiful workmanship, with an impressive stone fireplace and planked walls, solid wood doors, and antique furniture converted into bathroom sinks, etc. The only odd touches were a result of the wife’s aesthetic, which was different, to say the least. Pictures of babies laminated inside the bathroom door and filigreed gold switch cover plates. Also, angels around the grounds of the house. Nancy said the first thing that was going to go were the switch cover plates.

My brother was really excited about the house and eager to show us around. Since he has lived on a boat in a marina for years, this is the first house he has owned in a long time. Although my husband didn’t really want to go up and down the stairs and didn’t go on the first trip up with me, Mark got him to go up later to look at the bedroom, with its beautiful views of Mt. St. Helens.

It’s funny that they wanted a house on one floor, because just to get to the front door, you have to walk up a flight of stairs outside. The garage and downstairs bedroom are on the lower, half basement level.

Thursday, I was so tired that after doing the errands that we usually do on Tuesday (but couldn’t because I was in Portland with my friends), I lay down for a nap and woke up just before my makeup art class was supposed to start. I was doing a double that day, but I missed almost half of the first class, because it takes a half hour to drive in. Then, I just missed my teacher. She works her way around the room methodically and had just gotten to the person after me when I came in. I didn’t know what we were going to work on next, so I had to wait until she made it around the entire class, which took about a half hour. My sister and I were frustrated with this behavior on our first class with her, because we came in just a minute or two late and didn’t know what to do so had to wait for her to come around. But having worked with other teachers who were more inclined to skip around, and having been skipped many times, I think it is the fairest way to run that class. In any case, I finally got to start painting my starfish. It is a very complicated pattern of teals, aquas, and yellow, and I did the first coat of the teals. Normally, we would have painted the entire starfish teal and then added in the other colors, but the pattern was too complex to try to draw on top of the paint. I tried that with the sheep in the field on my Mont St. Michel picture, and one of them came out looking more like a cow because of double drawing that was slightly off.

On Friday, I began mowing the orchard. We originally bought our riding mower to mow the orchard, but Wayne doesn’t like the slope. I think that if we had bought a smaller mower, he would feel safer because he’d be lower down and I would feel more comfortable about learning how to use it. My sister, who uses their riding mower all the time, used ours once and said that you feel remarkably unstable on the seat. So, either they come over and mow or I have to do it with the self-propelled hand mower. I worked on it twice that day, once in the morning and once in the late afternoon after the sun had left it, and I got it about halfway done. I finished it on Sunday, being tied up on Saturday. It has a steep pitch to it, so the work is tiring.

In regard to the orchard, I was upset to notice that the buckets that we use to water our trees were all missing. They had been there a day or two before. At first, I thought Wayne might have moved them for some reason, but he did not, so I can only conclude that they were stolen. Whether I can attribute this to the general teasing that has been going on around our house, I don’t know, but stealing is a little different, even if some kids might have thought it was a funny idea. They are just five-gallon paint buckets with a hole drilled in the bottom so that we can fill them up with water and then let it leak out slowly. Last year, we just left them under whichever trees we had done last. I posted a note about it on our neighborhood Facebook page, hoping some parent would find them and make his kids return them, but no such luck.

This year, having replaced them with Firehouse Sub pickle buckets, we are going to have to take them back up to the house and bring them back down each time. Now, at least they have our address written on them. Who would think they had to worry about a thing like that? It’s one thing to be stealing some of our apples, which I think the neighborhood kids do every fall, but another to steal our buckets. We have several times caught them running away from our orchard when we arrived home, but we thought they were just playing by the pond, which we understand they used to do before we moved here.

I watered the trees on Monday afternoon and then gathered up the buckets.

On Saturday, Luke had his first class for a couple of weeks. Our attendance had been spotty anyway, because I hurt my hand a few weeks before that and missed a class. Well, it seems that if Luke misses classes he loses all his brains. We were trying to teach our dogs to put their paws on an object. The practical use of this is to be able to say “Paws” and have them put them up so we can look at them. Luke just didn’t get it at all. He was only putting his paws on his plastic dot by accident. Then, he got so obsessed by the treats that we used to teach this and that got dropped on the ground, that he failed coming when called miserably. He would sit until called, and then instead of running to me, like he knows very well how to do, he would run toward the nearest treat.

I have been really stupid about Luke. I noticed that I was finding lots of his hair around the house lately, but I was so obsessed with preparing for my guests and then entertaining them, that it didn’t occur to me until Tuesday that he was shedding his undercoat and should have had an appointment with the groomer a couple of weeks ago. Instead, because he also has a case of nettle rash, I thought he was pathologically pulling out his hair. He was, but because he’s supposed to! What an idiot! He has an appointment now, but it’s not until next week. We previously had a Keeshond, but he had no undercoat because he had a skin disease and had lost it, so I wasn’t familiar with the idea that Luke has to lose it every year.

I haven’t mentioned Hillary lately, but we are worried about her. She has gone through periods where I think she must have something really wrong with her because she throws up so much, to my thinking she just has a food allergy because we change her food and she stops throwing up. But lately, she hasn’t been able to keep anything down. We have moved her off regular food to baby food after she hardly ate anything anymore, and she liked the baby food at first, but now she hardly eats it. She has gotten really thin, which she never did before, throwing up or not. The other day, I tried her on kitten food, and she seemed to be ravenous and ate lots of it, but that was probably a mistake because after that she threw up, had diarrhea, and wet our bed. Now I’m afraid to try it again even though that was about the only thing she’s wanted to eat in a while. I think I’ll try boiling up some chicken next, as she has occasionally been able to eat something like that without vomiting.

On Saturday afternoon, Deb and I attended our next bad play at Magenta Theater. This one was really bad. It was a comedy about five women who inherit a theater. It wasn’t very funny, and it seemed as though it was also going to be very predictable. I was sitting there wondering what the point was and thinking that they probably got the rights to a very cheap play. At intermission, I leaned over to Deb and said, “What do you think about this play?” and she said, “I think we should leave immediately.” So, we did. Again, it was a British play, and again, the actors weren’t capable of doing the accents. I don’t know why they keep picking British plays. That’s three out of three. The last one of the year is Miracle on 34th Street, which is at least an American play, but I bet we’ll be getting bad Brooklyn or Bronx accents.

Instead of finishing the play, we went for a delicious Thai lunch and then wandered around town for a bit. There was a nice park nearby, but at that time of day it was just full of homeless people, so we didn’t go there. We also stopped at our favorite chocolatier and had some chocolate and coffee.

Yesterday, we took Luke for Puppy Play and Train only to find out that it was cancelled because some of the dogs had sniffles and a cough, although not, we were assured, kennel cough. It is cancelled for the entire week, and some of the dogs who didn’t get the message, like us, were very disappointed. One little Havanese wanted to play with Luke so badly that he peed on the floor. I am going to have to do some special things with Luke to keep him from getting too full of energy. Usually, I just work around the yard and let him run around or sometimes play ball with him. Maybe I’ll take him for a walk in the park.

I have seen quite a bit of the beavers swimming around in the pond this week, and Tuesday morning we saw a deer run across the road in front of another car. Monday afternoon we were sitting on our bench by the pond after watering the trees and the small birds around began making a fuss. I thought two birds were fighting, and I was watching carefully to see what they were, when a large bird of prey landed on a branch not 50 yards away from us. It was either a large hawk or a small golden eagle. I’m not sure how to tell them apart. I was trying to show Wayne where it was, but he didn’t spot it until it flew off again into a tree across the pond. It stayed there for a while, which we knew because of the fuss of the other birds. Then it flew off again toward my niece’s house but behind the trees so that we could barely catch a glimpse of it. Still for about a minute, it was in full view as it sat on the branch. I wish I had had my binoculars with me.

No hike last week because that was the day my friends left, and no picture, either. And that’s about it for this week.

 

 

 

All over the place

Because I had guests this week, I have been on the run every day and have lots of pictures. This was a particularly fun visit because of all the places we went.

On Thursday morning, my friends Ray and Karen and I left for Ashland and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, picking up Deb in Clackamas on the way. I thought it was going to be interesting, because none of these people had ever met each other before. They just all knew me. But everyone got along very well.

On our way down to Ashland, we stopped in Albany to have lunch. We had intended to eat a Novak’s Hungarian Restaurant, but they had had a fire and were closed. So, we ate at a restaurant where we stopped last year, Brick and Mortar Cafe. While we were waiting for our table, we walked down the street so that Karen and Ray could see the reconstructed carousel.

We arrived in Ashland about 5:00 PM and checked in. We stayed at the Tudor Inn, the same place as last year, but not in the old motel part of the inn. Instead, we were in rooms across the street, which were much more expensive because they were fancier and this was during the high season. Between my room and Deb’s and next to Ray’s and Karen’s was a little sitting room that seemed like it was just for us, even though it was open to the other guests and had an exit off one end. It was nice, but if we go next year, we’ll try to get in the motel again. The opulence isn’t really worth the difference in price since our original rooms were just fine and neat and clean, with everything new.

Then we went to get our tickets at the box office, had dinner early, and wandered around town until our first play started at 8:00. I thought that because it was high season, the stores might stay open later than 6:00, but just like before, most of the stores closed at 6:00 except the Bloomsbury Bookstore (a very good bookstore).

Our first play was All’s Well That Ends Well in the Elizabethan Theater. The reason we chose to go during the summer this year was so we could attend the open-air Elizabethan Theater. And now I have to confess to a certain amount of idiocy, because although I knew we were going to an outdoor theater, I didn’t put two and two together about the forecast temperature until I walked into the theater and saw they were selling blankets. I hadn’t even worn the layers I could have worn. And, although I had told my guests way back when that it was open air, they had apparently forgotten. What made it worse was that when Ray checked the forecast before coming, it was showing hot temperatures for his whole visit, so he didn’t even bring a jacket, just a fleece vest. (His only souvenir of the trip was an Oregon Shakespeare Festival sweatshirt, which he bought first thing the next morning.)

I had only read the play a few weeks before departing and noted it wasn’t one of Shakespeare’s best. Plus, I was curious about how some of the ideas would go over with a modern audience, particularly the ending, where, no matter how jerky the man had acted throughout the play, the happy ending was his marriage to the heroine, or more accurately, his falling in love with his wife. The play was entertaining, but we weren’t sure we liked some of the artistic decisions. The costumes were very weird, sort of a cross between Elizabethan and 19th century, with some 20th century thrown in. A very odd choice was made in Helena’s costumes to dress her like an Elizabethan boy at some times (well, a stylized Elizabethan costume) and in overalls at other times. I don’t mind the idea of placing a play in another time period, but I would like them to make up their minds. I thought the costumes were more distracting than otherwise.

The audience did boo Bertram during the course of the play, and of course, he was the reluctant groom who ends up in a supposedly happy marriage with Helena at the end. I guess the audience most likely would not have booed him in Elizabethan times.

The experience was a good one, but we froze our butts off, not being smart enough to buy blankets. As always, it was better to see the play for me than to try to read it, but this play is not one that has beautiful speeches in it.

These were the turkeys in the park that let me walk up to within four feet of them before they started casually strolling away

In the morning, we strolled around Limpia Park for a while, but we didn’t realize until we bought a hiking map later in the day, just how extensive it is. We could see there was a big gate farther in, but we didn’t go that far. In part of the park, they were preparing for two events, and in another part, we saw a bunch of wild turkeys. They let me go quite near to them.

The Elizabethan Theater with the first setting for Macbeth

The next day, we had two plays to go to. One was As You Like It, which took place in the larger of the two other theaters. As You Like It has never been one of my favorite plays, because it just seems disjointed to me. In addition, I seldom very much enjoy the humor of Elizabethan times, although like other things, I often find it funnier in performance. There were also some interesting costume choices in this play as well as some annoying stylized movements at times, including at the opening of the play.

We all went to see Macbeth, which was the final play for me and Deb, the one I was most excited about seeing. This play was more traditionally staged except that they moved some scenes around for no apparent reason. I don’t have the play memorized or anything, but it was pretty obvious when they started the play with a fairly boring informational scene (a discussion of what was going on with the king) instead of the witches. I am not sure what would lead them to make such a decision to start the play that way instead of eerily, as it was meant. However, the witches stayed on the stage for most of the play, observing and adding to the eeriness, and that was a good decision. We all liked this play much better.

The North Mountain Park Nature Center has paths and benches and deer grazing on the grounds.

The next day, only Ray and Karen had a play and that was in the evening, Alice in Wonderland, so we had the day to kill. Karen decided to stay in and write postcards, etc., while Deb and Ray and I went out exploring. First, we took a very short river walk. Then we went across the road to the North Mountain Park Nature Center. Finally, we walked a couple of miles on the Bear Creek Greenway, which is part of the Pacific Crest Trail, although at that point it was not in the mountains.

Recently, I heard of a new movie by Kenneth Branaugh about Shakespeare. I found out it had come out in 2018, but I couldn’t find it playing anywhere in our area, although I looked for it several times. To my delight, it was playing in Ashland. So, Saturday afternoon we all went to the movies. It was a very good movie, and I was happy to see it in a theater, because it had some nice panoramic shots.

Deb and I decided just to hang out in our rooms on Saturday night, although we went for dessert to Mix, a delicious bakery in Ashland, where we made a point to stop several times. We always split our desserts so didn’t feel too guilty about it. So, a quiet evening. Ray and Karen reported that they enjoyed their play and thought particularly that the costumes were very inventive. They also said that the few degrees warmer temperature made it much warmer in the audience, and they didn’t put their coats on until intermission.

Crater Lake

Early on Sunday morning, we got started, because our plan was to visit Crater Lake on the way home. We found out that only one road is open so far into the park, and that was the south one, which meant that we would have to backtrack on our way out rather than being able to come out farther north. The lake is simply breathtaking, so we were happy to have come even though it meant that we got home rather late. We took a picnic lunch with us. You could only drive up to the Rim Village and a bit beyond to Discovery Point to view the lake, although if we had had more time, we could have hiked farther.

We got home after 9:30 and discussed our plans for the next day, which turned out to be another long driving day. It was to Seattle, where we wanted to visit Chihuly Gardens and Glass. I have been wanting to see a Chihuly installation since I first looked at one online years ago. I have seen a couple of pieces of his in Meijer Gardens in Grand Rapids but have not been in a city where a garden was installed.

We met up with my brother and his son for lunch at Chinook’s. Delicious. Then we went to the gardens.

One of the exhibits in the Chihuly gallery outside the gardens. To give perspective, this was two full-sized boats (you can only see part of the second one on the left) filled with objects resembling sea life.

The work was beautiful, but I was a little disappointed because the garden was so small, and he only used a few different shapes of items. Particularly, there was no water installation, and I think the things he does with fountains and ponds are among his most interesting work. However, the gallery, although only of a half dozen or so rooms, was very beautiful.

After we left the gardens, we wandered around Seattle Center for a bit, and had a cool drink. Then it was time to hit the road, at about the very worst time possible. I ended up in a traffic jam for about an hour on the way to Tacoma, but after Tacoma, the rest of the way was fine. I think it took about twice as long to get from Seattle to Tacoma as it did to get from Tacoma to Seattle.

On Tuesday, my guests opted for a visit to Portland. We drove to the Cascades Station of the Max train, took the train into town, and walked to Powell’s books. I bought a handful of books. Then we had lunch at Deschutes Brewery and took the train home. For once, we were home by about four, so we had a lazy evening, just going out to dinner.

Wednesday morning I took my friends to the airport. Later in the afternoon, I went over to visit my brother and sister-in-law, who are now moving in to their new home in Amboy. They moved up from Berkeley a couple days ago.

So, it was an exciting week with lots going on.

 

Our guests arrive

A view of Dole Valley from the Tarbell Trail

Our Wednesday hike was to someplace different and a more difficult level of trail. We went to the Tarbell trailhead in the Yacolt Burn State Forest. We had gone there before but had taken the easier trail toward Rock Creek Campground. The other way is rated moderate in AllTrails, and I have so far been avoiding moderate trails. However, we took that way this week, toward Hidden Falls, and as far as we went, which was a couple of miles on a 10-mile trail, it wasn’t that much more difficult than some of our other hikes. We went with my niece, Katrina, and her two children, and we all had a good time. The trail takes you high above the Dole Valley, where we had some very nice views. Unfortunately, in some places it is logged right up to the trail. I don’t know why the forestry people can’t leave a six- to ten-foot area around the trail so that we can stay in the woods when we’re hiking. The logged areas are pretty hideous. We also ran into areas that had been logged in the past and were in various stages of recovery.

Most of the rest of the week centered on cleaning the house to get ready for our guests. However, I did take Luke to class on Saturday. Because I injured my hand so skipped last Saturday’s class and then there was no class on Memorial Day, he hadn’t been to class for two weeks, and it was like he’d lost all his brains. That is why, when the class had an unclassified special event at Lewisville Park on Monday, and because I won’t be here for Saturday class, I thought I should take him. It turned out to be a pack walk, at a fast clip, around the park. Between that pack walk and our mini pack walk, which on Monday was only me and Christine, I walked over 21,000 steps that day! I got home, pretty pooped, at 8:30 PM and still had to cook dinner and eat it. Cleaning the kitchen that night went out the window, so I had to get up extra early the next morning to make sure it was done.

Because, of course, yesterday morning my guests arrived. Karen’s plane from Detroit came in around 9:45 and Ray’s at 11:15, so Karen and I hung around the airport for a while waiting. We drove home, during which Ray remarked to Karen that she was going to be responsible for finding her way out of our neighborhood, a joke because the route seems complicated when you don’t know it. (You only take three roads after getting off WA-503, but they are wind-y, so it seems more complicated than it is.) After we had lunch on the back deck, the three of us (not Wayne, of course) decided to go for a walk, so we went to Moulton Falls, where we walked about four miles, taking Lukey along. So, lots of exercise so far this week.

And that’s about it for this week.